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Hearing management

Updated 11 December 2017

Noisy toys bad for kids' hearing

Some toys at the top of children's Christmas wish lists could pose a hearing threat, according to researchers.

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Some toys at the top of children's Christmas wish lists could pose a hearing threat, according to researchers.

They measured the noise levels of 24 popular toys and bought the 10 loudest to test in a soundproof booth. All 10 toys exceeded 90 decibels and several reached 100 decibels or more, which is about equal to the noise of a power mower, chain saw or subway train.

Extended, unprotected exposure to sounds above 85 decibels can lead to hearing damage, according to the American Academy of Otolaryngology.

"Generally, toys are safe if used properly," Dr Hamid Djalilian, an associate professor of otolaryngology and director of neurotology and skull base surgery at the University of California, Irvine, said in a university news release. "We tested the sound levels at the speaker and again at 12 inches, which is about the length of a toddler's arm."

Hearing problems may occur if a noisy toy is held too close to the ears, they found.

Sensitivity

"Children are very sensitive to loud and high-pitched sounds. Unfortunately, hearing loss from noise damage is permanent and not currently curable," Djalilian said.

If you're buying a noisy toy for a child, pay attention to location of the speaker. It's better if the speaker is on the underside of the toy instead of on top. Djalilian also suggested you hold the toy as a child would and listen to the sound.

"If it hurts your ears then it's probably too loud for a child," he said.


(Copyright © 2011 HealthDay. All rights reserved.)

 

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Dr Kara Hoffman graduated from UCT in 2004, thereafter she completed her year of community service in Durban. In 2010 she completed her Masters Degree in Paediatric Aural Rehabilitation from UKZN. In 2016, she became a Doctor of Audiology through the University of Arizona (ATSU). Dr Hoffman and her partner Lauren Thompson opened a fully diagnostic audiology practice called Thompson & Hoffman Audiology Inc. In 2011 with world-class technology and equipment to be able to offer the broad public all hearing-related services including hearing testing for adults and babies, vestibular (balance) assessments and rehabilitation, industrial audiology, hearing devices, central auditory processing assessments for school-aged children, school screening, neonatal hearing screening programmes at Alberlito and Parklands Hospital, cochlear implants and other implantable devices, medicolegal assessments and advanced electroacoustic assessments of hearing. Thompson and Hoffman Audiology Inc. are based at Alberlito Hospital in Ballito, St Augustines Hospital in Durban and at 345 Essenwood Road, Musgrave. The practices are all wheelchair friendly. There are three audiologists that practice from Thompson & Hoffman – including Dr Kara Hoffman, Lauren Thompson & Minette Lister. The practice boasts professional, highly qualified, and extensive diagnostic services where all your hearing healthcare needs can be met. The additional licensing in vestibular assessment and rehabilitation, paediatric rehabilitation and cochlear implantation places this practice in one of the top specialist audiological positions in South Africa, with a wealth of experience in all clinical areas of audiology and is a very well respected and sought-after practice.

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