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How to lose weight sensibly

The greatest weight loss myths

With so much clutter in the market place, it's worth debunking some of the myths around weight loss and seeing what evidence-based nutrition is telling us.

Obesity more deadly for men than women

It isn't clear why obese men are at greater risk for premature death than women, but it could be because obese men have greater insulin resistance, liver fat levels and diabetes risk than women.

Educated parents = anorexia risk

Girls whose mothers, fathers and grandparents are highly educated may have an increased risk of developing an eating disorder, a new study suggests.

Chew small bites to lose weight

Many weight-loss programs suggest eating smaller sized bites and savouring them in your mouth a little longer. Such advice may actually help cut food intake, researchers report.

Atkins diet tough on heart

A recent study which compared popular diets showed that the popular Ornish and South Beach diets seem to be easier on the heart than the high-fat, low-carbohydrate Atkins regimen.

Diet supplements affect other meds

People taking dietary supplements need to be careful that those don't interfere with any medical treatments they might be getting, a new report emphasises.

Stressed-out women eat more

The urge to chow down on sweets and fast food at stressful times knows no boundaries, at least among women. Men, it would appear, don’t seek the comfort eating ‘high’.

People 'illogical' about health

A burger lunch and a lettuce dinner. Pizza and beer to battle the blues. Sounds normal? It is, with a survey showing most people's attitude to healthy living is quite illogical.

Websites promote anorexia, bulimia

Psychiatrists called on the government on Friday to address the soaring numbers of websites which promote anorexia and bulimia as a lifestyle choice rather than an eating disorder.

Beware recession flab

People may reduce the amount they spend on food in response to a sour economy, but some experts fear they may pick up weight in the process.

Kids mimic parents' diet

Parents who want their preschoolers to eat their vegetables may need to take a hard look at their own eating habits, new research suggests.

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