Colds and flu

Updated 31 March 2016

4 ways sex may cure the common cold

Got the sniffles? A little romp between the sheets might be just the thing.

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Regular sex can help prevent you catching one of winter’s most universal ailments – the common cold. This is according to psychologists Carl Charnetski and Francis Brennan of Wilkes University, Pennsylvania, who claim that sexual activity boosts immunity.

According to their research, sex can lead to higher levels of Immunoglobulin A (IgA), which may offer some protection against disease.

This is however just one of the ways sex has been shown to ease the common cold; here are the others:

Touchy-feely: The sensation of touch during intimacy has been shown to have a positive impact on one’s emotional well-being. So, having an intimate moment with your lover will help you feel more upbeat, and fight off any aches and pains you may feel from being sick.

Better sleep: When you experience an orgasm, your body releases a hormone called oxytocin, also referred to as the “love hormone”, and this can make you quite sleepy. 

Painkiller: An article published in Cephalalgia, the journal of the International Headache Society, found that the endorphins released during orgasm can block pain, even the pain of a migraine. So if your congestion is resulting in a painful sinus headache, sex might be a viable option for curing it.

Read more:

Sex may boost brain power

When orgasms make you sick

Sources: Sexual frequency and salivary immunoglobulin A (IgA); Why sex is a better cure for headaches; Want to prevent colds? Have sex

 

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Flu expert

Dr Heidi van Deventer completed her MBChB (Bachelor of Medicine and Bachelor of Surgery) degree in 2004 at the University of Stellenbosch.
She has additional training in ACLS (Advanced Cardiac Life Support) and PALS (Paediatric Advanced Life Support) as well as biostatistics and epidemiology.

Dr Van Deventer is currently working as a researcher at the Desmond Tutu Tuberculosis Centre at the University of Stellenbosch.

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