Breast cancer

09 February 2011

Node removal good for breast cancer

A US study suggests that early stage breast cancer patients who have a small amount of lymph node removed fare as well as those who get more extensive surgery.

0

A US study suggests that early stage breast cancer patients who have a small amount of lymph node removed fare as well as those who get more extensive surgery.

Researchers examined data from women whose breast cancer had spread to a nearby lymph node and studied survival rates among those who had the first lymph node, or sentinel lymph node, removed compared to those who had lymph nodes from the armpit removed, known as auxillary lymph node dissection (ALND).

Their results showed that "do not benefit from the addition of ALND in terms of local control, disease-free survival, or overall survival, and that ALND may no longer be justified for certain patients," the study said.

"Implementation of this practise change would improve clinical outcomes in thousands of women each year by reducing the complications associated with ALND and improving quality of life with no diminution in survival."

The study

The California-based study included 891 patients who were followed from 1999 to 2004.

The limited surgical intervention resulted in five-year overall survival rates of 92.5% compared to 91.8% among those who had more lymph nodes taken out.

Disease-free survival was also similar across the two groups, with 83.9% in the sentinel node group and 82.2% in the group that had more extensive intervention.

The research was published in the Journal of the American Medical Association.

(Sapa, February 2011)

Read more:

Breast cancer rise is alarming

Breast cancer shows up in hair

 

Read Health24’s Comments Policy

Comment on this story
0 comments
Comments have been closed for this article.

Ask the Expert

Breast cancer expert

Dr Gudgeon qualified in Birmingham, England, in 1968. She has more than 40 years experience in oncology, and in 1994 she founded her practice, Cape Breast Care, where she treats benign and malignant breast cancers. Dr Boeddinghaus obtained her qualification at UCT Medical School in 1994 and her MRCP in London in 1998. She has worked extensively in the field of oncology and has a special interest in the hormonal management of breast cancer. She now works with Dr Gudgeon at Cape Breast Care. Read more.

Still have a question?

Get free advice from our panel of experts

The information provided does not constitute a diagnosis of your condition. You should consult a medical practitioner or other appropriate health care professional for a physical exmanication, diagnosis and formal advice. Health24 and the expert accept no responsibility or liability for any damage or personal harm you may suffer resulting from making use of this content.

* You must accept our condition

Forum Rules