11 July 2011

Protein diet makes you feel fuller

A new study demonstrates that higher-protein meals improve perceived appetite and satiety in overweight and obese men during weight loss.


A new study demonstrates that higher-protein meals improve perceived appetite and satiety in overweight and obese men during weight loss. According to the research, published in Obesity, higher-protein intake led to greater satiety throughout the day as well as reductions in both late-night and morning appetite compared to a normal protein diet.

"Research has shown that higher-protein diets, those containing 18% to 35% of daily calories intake from dietary protein, are associated with reductions in hunger and increased fullness throughout the day and into the evening hours," said Heather Leidy, PhD, study author and professor in the Department of Nutrition and Exercise Physiology at the University of Missouri (US). "In our study, the two groups ate either 25% or 14% of calories from protein, while the total calories and percent of calories from fat stayed the same between the higher-protein and normal-protein diet patterns. "

During the study, Leidy and associates also conducted an eating frequency sub-study in which the 27 participants on both normal- and higher-protein diets consumed either three meals or six meals per day. The researchers found that eating frequency had no effect on appetite and satiety on the normal-protein diet. However, subjects on the higher-protein diet who ate three meals per day experienced greater evening and late-night fullness than those who ate six meals per day.

Dietary protein and reduced calorie consumption

This study supports previous research that demonstrates higher-protein diets, including egg breakfasts, are associated with decreased calorie consumption. A study published last year in Nutrition Research showed that men ate roughly 112 fewer calories at a buffet lunch and 400 fewer calories in the 24-hour period following a protein-rich egg breakfast compared to a bagel breakfast. Another study demonstrated that overweight dieters who ate eggs for breakfast lost 65% more weight and felt more energetic than those who ate a bagel breakfast of equal calories and volume.

Protein: a component of a healthy meal pattern

Protein not only plays a role in weight management but is also important in muscle maintenance and the prevention of sarcopenia which is age-related muscle loss. The 2010 Dietary Guidelines for Americans highlight that healthy Americans can have an egg a day to help meet dietary protein needs, and eggs are included in the protein foods section of MyPlate.

"Americans should include dietary protein sources at every meal," says Serena Ball, MS, RD, registered dietitian, nutrition consultant and advisor to the Egg Nutrition Centre. "The 2010 Dietary Guidelines and MyPlate education series highlight that protein is an important component of a healthy diet."

Give eggs the company they deserve

Serena Ball suggests pairing protein-rich eggs with whole grains, fruits, vegetables and dairy for a complete, healthy breakfast. Some meal and recipe ideas include:

- (EurekAlert!, July 2011)

Read more:
Egg breakfast keeps you slim
The problem with high-protein slimming diets


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