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31 May 2011

Gays vs. Qwelane

Jon Qwelane has been found guilty of hate speech. Here is the article written at the time on the offensive column by an angry gay activist.

Jon Qwelane , former Sunday Sun columnist, and present SA ambassador to Uganda, has been found guilty of hate speech.

Here is the article written at the time on the offensive column by an angry gay activist:

Homo-prejudice is alive and well and flourishing in South Africa. Every day gay and lesbian individuals are taunted, teased and bullied on our streets.

Black lesbians living in our township areas are at a particularly high risk of rape, in the belief that this horrendous act will magically "cure" them of their sexual orientation. There are increasing reports of lesbians being murdered because of their sexual orientation. Gay and lesbian youth are evicted from their homes. We're discriminated against by employers, bullied and taunted in schools; we experience bias from the SAPS and are discriminated against by the public health system. Pastors preach homo-prejudice from countless pulpits every Sunday.

Just last week I read a post on the internet from a man who said that if he's in a restaurant and thinks his waiter could be gay he complains to the manager and demands to be served by someone else. Would he similarly complain to the manager if his waiter were black, or white, or Muslim, or overweight or underweight or had red hair?

A couple of Sundays ago, the Sunday Sun, which is owned by Media24, published a column by Jon Qwelane which promoted the worst kind of homoprejudice. So the following Friday I chose to take a taxi into Cape Town, to the Media24 headquarters, to participate in a public protest against this. The outspoken taxi driver cursed other drivers by referring to them as either "moffies" or "bunnies".

 
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