advertisement
01 July 2011

Internet sex offenders show patterns

About two-thirds of Internet sexual offenders bring up the topic of sex during the first chat session with adolescents and young adults, a new study has found.

About two-thirds of Internet sexual offenders bring up the topic of sex during the first chat session with adolescents and young adults, a new study has found.

Among the other findings:

  • More than half of the Internet sexual offenders said they disguise their identity when online, and most said they prefer communicating with teen girls rather than boys.
  • More than half of the high school girls (56.7%) in the study knew about sexting (sending sexually explicit messages or photos electronically), compared with 46.9 percent of boys. Private school students were more likely to know about sexting than public school students --75 % versus 50%.
  • Of the 59 middle school students who said they chatted with strangers online, 32 of them said they had met the stranger in person, and three of these said they were sexually assaulted or inappropriately touched.
  • Of the 51 high school boys who said they had a face-to-face meeting with a stranger they met online, 33 said "something sexual" (consensual) happened, and 10 reported being threatened or sexually assaulted.
  • Of the 58 high school girls who said they met in person with a stranger they met online, 21 said something sexual happened and seven said they were threatened or sexually assaulted.

 
NEXT ON HEALTH24X

More:

SexNews
advertisement

Read Health24’s Comments Policy

Comment on this story
0 comments
Comments have been closed for this article.

Live healthier

Lifestyle »

E-cigarettes: Here are five things to know

E-cigarettes have become hugely popular in the past decade, but a rash of vaping-linked deaths and illnesses in the US is feeding caution about a product that's already banned in some places.

Allergy »

Ditch the itch: Researchers find new drug to fight hives

A new drug works by targeting an immune system antibody called immunoglobulin E, which is responsible for the allergic reaction that causes hives.