advertisement
Updated 14 May 2018

Is squirting a real thing?

#Trending columnist Jade Zwane’s candid, no-holds-barred way of talking about sex has made her a reader favourite. Here she answers questions from our readers.

0

#Trending columnist Jade Zwane’s candid, no-holds-barred way of talking about sex has made her a reader favourite. Here she answers questions from City Press readers:

Question: I’ve been with the same partner for almost a decade and I’m looking for ways to spice up our relationship. To help, we’ve been watching some pornography, which has made me curious about women who can squirt. I’ve not witnessed something like that in real life and have only experienced drenched sheets. Is it really possible for women to squirt? If so, how can I learn to?

Jade: The portrayal of squirting in porn is often exaggerated. Your drenched sheets are a sign that you’re squirting, just not in the same way as in pornography films.

Does it feel good just before you wet the sheets? What you can do is, after intercourse and wetting the bed sheets, you can have your partner use his fingers to stimulate your vaginal canal and see if you squirt.

Having his penis inside you while you squirt can redirect your ejaculation to the sheets, instead of up like in porn.

Question: I’ve been dealing with erectile dysfunction and have no idea why or what to do about it. I smoke cigarettes and dagga, and eat a lot of junk food. I don’t know for sure if it’s any of those or if it’s mental. Could masturbating also be the reason?

Jade: Is your erection any stronger when you masturbate? How old are you? Do you take any supplements that could be affecting the strength of your erection? It could be that you get yourself into a state of panic or it could be your lifestyle. Cut down on the smokes and quit the cannabis. Eat healthier food and try to add light exercise to your routine.

Most importantly, relax when you’re with your partner. If there is no improvement after a month to six weeks, consult your medical practitioner.

Question: I’ve been with my husband for 22 years and we’re happy in most aspects of our relationship. The only issue is that, after all these years, we don’t have much sex. It doesn’t matter what we do, sex is always painful. My husband gives good oral sex and I can orgasm from it, but when it comes to him penetrating me, it becomes too painful. What can I do?

Jade: I’m glad that you’re able to climax during oral sex – that’s a great start. There’s a condition called vaginismus, where a woman experiences pain during penetration, when using tampons or even when consulting the gynaecologist for a pap smear.

Sometimes it can be psychological, which means talking through your subconscious fears with a therapist may help. That said, it could also be physical. I suggest you consult your doctor to determine a way forward.

TALK TO US

Do you have a question for Jade?
SMS the keyword SEX and your question to 35697. You can also email us at trending@citypress.co.za. SMSes cost R1.50. Please include your name and province

 
NEXT ON HEALTH24X
advertisement

Read Health24’s Comments Policy

Comment on this story
0 comments
Add your comment
Comment 0 characters remaining

Live healthier

Contraceptives and you »

Scientists create new contraceptive from seaweed Poor long-term birth control training leads to 'accidents'

7 birth control myths you should stop believing

Will the Pill make you gain weight? Can you fall pregnant while breastfeeding? We bust seven common myths about birth control.

Your digestive health »

Causes of digestive disorders 9 habits that could hurt your digestive system

Your tummy rumblings might help diagnose bowel disorder

With the assistance of an 'acoustic belt', doctors can now determine the cause of your tummy troubles.