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03 March 2011

Smoking in first trimester damages the baby's heart

Babies born to women who smoke in the first trimester of pregnancy are more likely to have a congenital heart defect than are the offspring of mothers who don't smoke, a new study shows.

Babies born to women who smoke in the first trimester of pregnancy are more likely to have a congenital heart defect than are the offspring of mothers who don't smoke, a new study shows.

The findings of this and other studies suggest that eliminating smoking before or very early in pregnancy could prevent as many as 100 cases of right ventricular outflow tract obstructions and 700 cases of atrial septal defects each year in the US, according to the CDC. For atrial septal defects alone, the agency said, that could save as much as $16 million a year in hospitals costs.

Why pregnant women need to stop smoking

 
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