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07 June 2010

Minding your childminder

At last you’ve found a childminder you are happy with. But remember that the better you treat your childminder, the greater the chances that she will take good care of your child.

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At last you’ve found a childminder you are happy with. But remember that the better you treat your childminder, the greater the chances that she will take good care of your child.

The Child Accident Prevention Foundation (CAPFSA) published the following guidelines:

  • Encourage the childminder to visit your home and get to know your children. It will also help her to understand your household, parenting style, as well as your children’s daytime and night-time routine.
  • Make adequate preparations for your childminder including refreshments and activities they can do with your children.
  • Make sure that she is trained in CPR and first aid.
  • Make sure she knows and understands how to contact emergency services and when it should become necessary.
  • Don’t leave a childminder alone with several children for long periods of time. It is unfair to do so.
  • Never take advantage of your childminder by leaving her to cope with an already sick child who will not settle.
  • Make sure that the childminder knows how to contact you.
  • If your childminder is younger than sixteen years, realise that you remain responsible for your child even during your absence from home. You are also responsible for the safety and care of the childminder.
  • Talk to your childminder about your child’s progress, especially if she does not see your child regularly.
  • Return home at the time you agreed. If you are going to be late, inform your childminder by telephone. If you don’t have a telephone at home, call the nearest trusted neighbour.
  • Arrangements for the safe return home of the childminder should be made. Never allow a childminder to travel home alone late at night.
  • If you feel unhappy about any aspect of the care of your child, talk it over with the childminder as soon as the matter arises.

(The Child Accident Prevention Foundation (CAPFSA), Health24)

 
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