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06 June 2012

Mom's smoking as a teen is a risk for offspring

Mothers who used marijuana as teens—long before having children—may have put their future children at a higher risk of drug abuse, new research suggests.

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Mothers who used marijuana as teens—long before having children—may have put their future children at a higher risk of drug abuse, new research suggests.

Researchers in the Neuroscience and Reproductive Biology section at the Cummings School of Veterinary Medicine conducted a study to determine the transgenerational effects of cannabinoid exposure in adolescent female rats.

For three days, adolescent rats were administered the cannabinoid receptor agonist WIN-55, 212-2, a drug that has similar effects in the brain as THC, the active ingredient in marijuana. After this brief exposure, they remained untreated until being mated in adulthood.

The male offspring of the female rats were then measured against a control group for a preference between chambers that were paired with either saline or morphine. The rats with mothers who had adolescent exposure to WIN-55,212-2 were significantly more likely to opt for the morphine-paired chamber than those with mothers who abstained. The results suggest that these animals had an increased preference for opiate drugs.

Maternal drug impacts future offspring

The study was published in the Journal of Psychopharmocology and funded by the National Institutes of Health.

"Our main interest lies in determining whether substances commonly used during adolescence can induce behavioural and neurochemical changes that may then influence the development of future generations," said Research Assistant Professor John J. Byrnes, the study's lead author, "We acknowledge that we are using rodent models, which may not fully translate to the human condition.

Nevertheless, the results suggest that maternal drug use, even prior to pregnancy, can impact future offspring."

More research needed

Byrnes added that much research is needed before a definitive connection is made between adolescent drug use and possible effects on future children.

The study builds on earlier findings by the Tufts group, most notably a study published in Behavioural Brain Research by Assistant Professor Elizabeth Byrnes that morphine use as adolescent rats induces changes similar to those observed in the present study.

Other investigators in the field have previously reported that cannabinoid exposure during pregnancy (in both rats and humans) can affect offspring development, including impairment of cognitive function, and increased risk of depression and anxiety.

(Eurek Alert, June 2012) 

Read more:

Babies of smoking moms weigh 200g less

 

 
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