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Updated 10 September 2014

Gauteng Health MEC admits liability for baby's brain damage

The Gauteng Health MEC, Qedani Mahlangu, admitted full liability for brain damage suffered by a boy from Duduza, on the East Rand, after hospital staff allegedly failed to properly monitor him after birth,

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The Saturday Citizen reported that the R13.1 million damages claim by Christina Sarah Kau, on behalf of her now seven-year-old son Kamogelo, was postponed indefinitely in the High Court in Pretoria for a civil trial to determine the amount of the damages awarded.

Kau reportedly underwent a Caesarean section at the Pholosong Hospital in October 2007 because she suffered from diabetes and high blood pressure.

According to medical reports, Kamogelo was normal at birth and could suck and swallow, but later fell ill because of low blood sugar and oxygen levels.

Read: Why low blood pressure is dangerous in children 

As a result he suffered severe brain damage with cerebral palsy. He only started chewing, swallowing and holding his neck up at the age of six.

He cannot feed himself and has no bladder control.

According to a report by a neurologist, no one checked on Kau or her baby during the night of his birth, and if his condition was immediately treated, his injuries could have been prevented.

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Image: mom and baby from Shutterstock

 
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