advertisement
12 July 2012

Breastfed babies prone to nut allergy

Children who are solely breastfed in the first six months of life are at increased risk of developing a nut allergy, new research showed.

0

Children who are solely breastfed in the first six months of life are at increased risk of developing a nut allergy, new research showed.

A study by The Australian National University, published in the International Journal of Pediatrics, investigated the link in primary school children in the Australian Capital Territory, of which Canberra is the capital.

How the study was done

Parents of more than 15 000 children at 110 schools were asked to report if their child had a nut allergy, and on feeding habits in the first six months of life.

The study found the risk of developing a nut allergy was one-and-a-half times higher in children who were only breastfed in their first six months.

But children fed food and fluids other than breast milk were protected against nut allergies.

"Our results contribute to the argument that breast feeding alone does not appear to be protective against nut allergy in children - it may, in fact, be causative of allergy," said study author Marjan Kljakovic.

"Despite breast feeding being recommended as the sole source of nutrition in the first six months of life, an increasing number of studies have implicated breast feeding as a cause of the increasing trend in nut allergy.

"Peanut allergy accounts for two-thirds of all fatal food-induced allergic reactions," added Kljakovic, a professor at the university's medical school.

"It is important for us to understand how feeding practises might be playing a part."

(AFP, July 2012)

Read more:
All about breastfeeding

 
NEXT ON HEALTH24X

More:

ChildNews
advertisement

Read Health24’s Comments Policy

Comment on this story
0 comments
Comments have been closed for this article.

Live healthier

FYI »

When the flu turns deadly Why the flu makes you feel so miserable

Could a deadly flu strain hit SA this winter?

Following an intense flu season in the US and UK, should we be worried about our own upcoming flu season?

Alcohol and acne »

Dagga vs alcohol: Which is worse? SEE: Why you are drinking more alcohol than you realise

Does alcohol cause acne?

Some foods can be a trigger for acne, but what about alcohol? Dermatologist Dr Nerissa Moodley weighs in.