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01 December 2010

Keep your kids safe over the summer

With the summer season approaching, pools are not the only things that can be hazardous to your children during the coming holidays.

It's a parent's ultimate nightmare - a toddler floating face down in the pool. But with the summer season approaching, pools are not the only things that can be hazardous to your children during the coming holidays.

 

  • Swimming lessons are a good idea, but experts are divided on the age when these should start. The recommended age varies from three months to four years.

    • Make sure that all children are wearing safety belts, or are strapped into SABS-approved car seats when you travel. Never hold children on the lap.
    • Keep children away from braai fires and inflammable materials. Do no let matches or lighters lie around in your house. The Red Cross Children's Hospital annually treats 900 children for burn injuries.
    • Always make sure that children who are rollerskating or skateboarding wear helmets and knee and elbow pads.
    • Keep plastic bags out of the reach of children. These include packets wrapped around Christmas presents.
    • Prevent choking by keeping round, hard foods and sweets, and any small objects, where children cannot get hold of them.
    • Make sure young children are always supervised by an adult, difficult as it may be with all the distractions over the holiday season.

 
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