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09 June 2010

Family visits: Play it safe

Many young children visit their grandparents on a frequent basis, which means seniors have to make sure their homes are poison-proof before the kids arrive.

It's great when the grandchildren come to visit and spend time, but grandparents need to remember that prescription medicines are dangerous and they should poison-proof their homes before the kids arrive.

Simple safety steps 
Here are some simple steps that grandparents can take to reduce the risk of accidental poisonings:

  • Keep all medicines and vitamins in containers with child-resistant caps. Don't keep medicines in cups or 'reminder containers.' After using the product, always make sure the child-resistant cap is properly secured.
  • Ensure that all medicines, cleaning products and other household chemicals are out of reach of children and locked away.
  • Go through your medicine cabinet and flush outdated medicines down the toilet. Rinse liquids bottles before you discard them.
  • When you take your medicines, do it out of the child's view. Children love to imitate adults.
  • Keep your foods and household chemicals stored apart from each other.
  • Keep products in their original containers. Don't put paints, solvents, lamp oil or pesticides in bottles, glasses, or jars that are usually used for food.
  • If a child does swallow medicines or chemicals - or you suspect it - call a doctor immediately. Post the number in a visible location near your phone.

 
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