advertisement
02 August 2017

The reality of the so-called placebo effect is well established.

The reality of the so-called placebo effect is well established. US Scientists have discovered that it works for the emotional impact of romantic rejection, too. They monitored the brain activity of volunteers who had recently undergone an "unwanted romantic breakup”. When participants were given a nasal spray which – they were told – could reduce emotional pain, they felt less emotional distress when shown a picture of their ex and areas of their brain associated with feel-good chemicals like dopamine became more active, while others linked to rejection quieted.

advertisement

Live healthier

Mental health & your work »

How open are you about mental illness in the workplace?

Mental health in the workplace – what you can do to help

If you know that one of your colleagues suffers from a mental illness, would you be able to help them at work? Maligay Govender offers some helpful mental health "first aid" tips.

Sleep & You »

Sleep vs. no sleep Diagnosis of insomnia

6 things that are sabotaging your sleep

Kick these shut-eye killers to the kerb and make your whole life better – overnight.