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23 November 2010

Upper-class don't recognise emotion

Upper-class people have more educational opportunities and better job prospects than people from lower social classes, but that doesn't mean they're more skilled at everything.

Upper-class people have more educational opportunities, greater financial security, and better job prospects than people from lower social classes, but that doesn't mean they're more skilled at everything.

A new study published in Psychological Science finds surprisingly, that lower-class people are better at reading the emotions of others.

One experiment used volunteers who worked at a university. Some had graduated from college and others had not; researchers used educational level as a proxy for social class.

The volunteers did a test of emotion perception, in which they were instructed to look at pictures of faces and indicate which emotions each face was displaying.

People with more education performed worse on the task than people with less education. In another study, university students who were of higher social standing (determined from each student's self-reported perceptions of his or her family's socioeconomic status) had a more difficult time accurately reading the emotions of a stranger during a group job interview. 

 
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