advertisement
24 May 2013

Personality disorder affects emotion perception

In studies, patients with borderline personality disorder sometimes saw anger in a 'neutral' face and reacted to that threat.

Symptoms of borderline personality disorder often mimic traits of other psychiatric disorders, complicating diagnosis and treatment. But researchers in Canada say they have identified a characteristic that may be unique to borderline personality disorder: a tendency to misinterpret emotions expressed by the face.

Although more research is needed to understand the brain mechanisms involved in these misperceptions and their significance, Ruocco called these "potentially important" deficits.

"There may be neurobiological factors that contribute to these biases in emotion perception," he said. Pinpointing those factors might lead to better understanding of the illness and improved treatments.

Not only did subjects with borderline personality disorder misread facial emotions, the studies showed, but they also took more time to interpret facial emotions than others. And when they perceived anger, it induced stronger reactions than in healthy control subjects, Ruocco's team found.

The National Education Alliance for Borderline Personality Disorder has more about borderline personality disorder.

 
NEXT ON HEALTH24X
advertisement

Read Health24’s Comments Policy

Comment on this story
0 comments
Comments have been closed for this article.

Live healthier

Lifestyle »

E-cigarettes: Here are five things to know

E-cigarettes have become hugely popular in the past decade, but a rash of vaping-linked deaths and illnesses in the US is feeding caution about a product that's already banned in some places.

Allergy »

Ditch the itch: Researchers find new drug to fight hives

A new drug works by targeting an immune system antibody called immunoglobulin E, which is responsible for the allergic reaction that causes hives.