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13 February 2018

There’s an actual health reason why you should do good

There is a way to cope with the volume of stressful events we are exposed to on a near-daily basis.

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If the constant stream of bad news from around the world gets to you, one psychiatrist suggests that helping others might make you feel better.

"The sheer volume of stressful events occurring on a near-daily basis can make people feel pessimistic or fearful," said researcher Emanuel Maidenberg, a clinical professor of psychiatry at the University of California, Los Angeles.

Coping with an uncertain world

"As we continue adapting to the ever-increasing speed of the news cycle, it's important to take a moment to explore the impact it is having on how we feel, behave and think, to better take care of ourselves," he added in a university news release.

Professor Maidenberg suggested a number of ways to cope with an uncertain world.

You can gain a sense of control by helping others. Making a donation or volunteering your time to help others can ease feelings of helplessness, he said.

A Health24 article supports the concept that people with a tendency toward depression can help themselves by helping others or otherwise introducing positivity into their day-to-day lives.

More leisure activities

If you feel overwhelmed, seek social support. This could include something like joining a book club or other type of group, Professor Maidenberg explained.

In addition, it's a good idea to do more leisure activities that you enjoy, get more exercise, and maintain a consistent sleep schedule.

Finally, Professor Maidenberg advised, limit your exposure to news. Restrict it to certain times of the day or certain days of the week. It might also be a good idea to limit your sources of news. For example, read a newspaper but don't scroll through Twitter.

Image credit: iStock

 
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