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12 April 2010

Shyness rooted in brain process

Because their brains process the world around them in a different way, shy people respond differently to physical and emotional stimuli than other people, according to a study.

Because their brains process the world around them in a different way, introverted or shy people respond differently to physical and emotional stimuli than other people, according to a new study.

About 20% of people are "highly sensitive," an inborn trait that can be seen in children who are reserved, need little disciplining, cry easily, ask unusual questions or have especially deep thoughts, explained Elaine and Arthur Aron and colleagues from Stony Brook University in New York and in China.
 

Compared to non-sensitive people, the sensitive participants looked at the photos that had the subtle changes for a longer time and had much greater activation in brain areas involved in associating visual input with other input to the brain, and with visual attention. These areas aren't used simply for vision, but for a deeper processing of input.
 

 
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