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30 June 2011

How the brain takes a joke

British scientists say they have uncovered how the human brain responds to jokes, research that could help determine whether patients in a vegetative state can have happy emotions.

British scientists say they have uncovered how the human brain responds to jokes, research that could help determine whether patients in a vegetative state can experience positive emotions.

"We found a characteristic pattern of brain activity when the jokes used were puns," Matt Davis, who co-led the research, said in a statement. "For example, jokes like 'Why don't cannibals eat clowns? Because they taste funny!' involved brain areas for language processing more than jokes that didn't involve wordplay."

 
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