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05 August 2011

Have we met before?

Scientists looked at why we recognise faces much better if we have extra clues as to where or indeed when we encountered them in the first place.

Scientists looked at why we recognise faces much better if we have extra clues as to where or indeed when we encountered them in the first place. The research was led by Dr Clea Warburton and Dr Gareth Barker at the University of Bristol's School of Physiology and Pharmacology and published in the Journal of Neuroscience. The study found that when we need to remember that a particular object, for example a face, occurred in a particular place, or at a particular time, multiple brain regions have to work together - not independently.

These most recent studies, however, are the first to look at situations where these brain regions interact all together, rather than considering each one individually.

 
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