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14 October 2010

Brain responds more to close friends

People's brains are more responsive to friends than to strangers, even if the stranger has more in common, according to a study issue of The Journal of Neuroscience.

People's brains are more responsive to friends than to strangers, even if the stranger has more in common, according to a study issue of The Journal of Neuroscience. Researchers examined a brain region known to be involved in processing social information, and the results suggest that social alliances outweigh shared interests.

"There are psychological and evolutionary arguments for the idea that the social factors of 'similarity' and 'closeness' could get privileged treatment in the brain; for example, to identify insiders versus outsiders or kin versus non-kin," Krienen said. "However, these results suggest that social closeness is the primary factor, rather than social similarity, as previously assumed."

 
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