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17 December 2010

Brain anomaly leaves woman without fear

Researchers studied a woman missing the part of the brain believed to generate fear and reported that their findings may help improve treatment for PTSD, phobias and other anxiety disorders.

Researchers who have studied a woman with a missing amygdala - the part of the brain believed to generate fear - report that their findings may help improve treatment for post-traumatic stress disorder (PTSD) and other anxiety disorders.

S.M. suffers from an extremely rare disease that destroyed her amygdala. Future observations will determine if her condition affects anxiety levels for everyday stressors such as finance or health issues, said study author Justin Feinstein, a University of Iowa doctoral student studying clinical neuropsychology.

 
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