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13 December 2010

Boxing bad for the brain

Up to 20% of professional boxers develop neuropsychiatric sequelae.

Up to 20% of professional boxers develop neuropsychiatric sequelae. But which acute complications and which late sequelae can boxers expect throughout the course of their career?

These are the questions studied by Hans Förstl from the Technical University Munich and his co-authors in Deutsches Ärzteblatt International.

With regard to the health risks, a clear difference exists between professional boxing and amateur boxing. Amateur boxers are examined regularly every year and in advance of boxing matches, whereas professionals subject themselves to their fights without such protective measures. In view of the risk for injuries that may result in impaired cerebral performance in the short or long term, similar measures would be advisable in the professional setting too.(EurekAlert/ December 2010)

 
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