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Stroke

05 May 2010

Mini-stroke is often ignored

Three out of 10 people who suffer a minor stroke or a "mini-stroke" don't get medical help in time, upping their likelihood of going on to have a major stroke, new research shows.

Three out of 10 people who suffer a minor stroke or a "mini-stroke" don't get medical help in time, upping their likelihood of going on to have a major stroke, new research shows.

While the importance of rapid treatment for stroke is now widely recognised, less is known about whether people who suffer mini-strokes get prompt care.

People who have these mini-strokes -- what doctors call transient ischemic attacks, or TIAs - are now known to be at high risk of full-fledged strokes in the following hours and days, Dr Arvind Chandratheva of the University of Oxford in the UK and colleagues point out in the journal Stroke. What's more, it's fairly easy to identify who among these patients is at highest risk, and starting preventive treatments early is "highly effective."

Symptoms same as a stroke
 

Among the patients who had TIAs, 459 in all, 67 percent sought medical help within 24 hours, and 47% did so within three hours, the researchers found. Among the 541 patients who had minor strokes, 74% got medical help within a day, and 46 percent did so within three hours. Three-quarters of the study participants went to their primary care physician first.
 

 

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