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Stroke

Updated 30 July 2014

Even 'silent strokes' can harm memory, thinking

People who experience stroke-like symptoms, but do not have full-blown strokes, are at higher risk for memory and thinking problems, a new study finds.

People who experience stroke-like symptoms -- so-called "silent strokes" -- but do not have full-blown strokes are still at higher risk for memory and thinking problems, a new study finds.

Kelley's team's study involved nearly 24 000 people, average age 64, who completed stroke-symptom questionnaires at the start of the study and every six months after that for at least two years. Their memory and thinking skills were also tested yearly.

Knowing symptoms is key

The US National Institute of Neurological Disorders and Stroke outlines the symptoms of a stroke.

 

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