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Stroke

03 October 2011

Smokers more likely to have strokes

Not only are smokers twice as likely to have strokes, they are almost a decade younger than non-smokers when they have them.

Not only are smokers twice as likely to have strokes, they are almost a decade younger than non-smokers when they have them, according to a study presented today at the Canadian Stroke Congress.

Smoking causes a build-up of debris on the inside of blood vessels, a condition called arteriosclerosis, and it contributes to a higher likelihood of clots forming, said Dr Pipe.

  • reduce tobacco access to minors
  • ensure tobacco is appropriately priced
  • act more aggressively to deal with contraband tobacco
  • be more systematic, from a health system's point of view, in terms of helping those who are smokers quit
  • create an integrated smoking cessation unit within the health community

 

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