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Stroke

09 March 2009

Many miss out on stroke treatment

Most people who have strokes don't act quickly enough to get the clot-dissolving treatment that can limit brain damage, a new study finds.

Most people who have strokes don't act quickly enough to get the clot-dissolving treatment that can limit brain damage, a new study finds.

Rose and her colleagues studied data on 15 117 people treated for strokes at 46 hospitals in North Carolina between 2005 and 2008. Treatment for an ischaemic stroke, in which a clot blocks a blood vessel in the brain, is an injection of clot-dissolving tissue plasminogen activator (tPA), but that is effective only in the first three hours after a stroke occurs.

  • Sudden numbness or weakness of the face, arm or leg, especially on one side of the body.
  • Sudden confusion, trouble speaking or understanding.
  • Sudden trouble seeing in one or both eyes.
  • Sudden trouble walking, dizziness, loss of balance or coordination.
  • Sudden, severe headache with no know cause.

August 2008

 

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