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Stop-smoking

09 December 2010

'Ban electronic cigarettes until they are safe'

Electronic cigarettes should be banned until safety concerns have been addressed, researchers say.

Electronic cigarettes should be banned until safety concerns have been addressed, University of California researchers say.

  • Fluid containing nicotine leaked out of most cartridges.
  • The devices were difficult to take apart or put together without getting nicotine all over the user's hands.
  • Nicotine cartridge labeling was poor, with most replacement packs lacking any indication of cartridge content, expiration date, or health warnings.
  • Cartridges that claimed to have no nicotine content looked identical to those that claimed to have high nicotine content, making them indistinguishable once removed from their packs and wrappers.
  • All brands had "ambiguous amounts of nicotine," with stated levels ranging from 6 milligrams to 24 mg.
  • None of the instruction leaflets or product Web sites offered adequate instructions for proper disposal of used cartridges.
  • Safety features did not always work correctly.
  • Print and Internet material often contained information or claims that could not be backed up by scientific evidence. Examples included: "Be careful to avoid inhaling any significant quantity of fluid. Although it gives you a slight tingling sensation, it is not harmful," and "Within two weeks your lung capacity will increase by 30 percent ... Wrinkles in your skin will become less noticeable."

Because electronic cigarettes are smokeless, they are marketed to smokers for use in non-smoking areas.

 

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