advertisement

Osteoporosis

02 November 2006

Preventing hip fractures

A computerised study of hip bones suggests that certain exercises could limit the steep increase in hip fracture risk that occurs as people grow old, British researchers report.

A computerised study of hip bones suggests that certain exercises could limit the steep increase in hip fracture risk that occurs as people grow old, British researchers report.

Thinning of cortex linked to type of exercise
The investigators found that the cortex, the outer layer of the femur, became progressively thinner with age. The thickness of the cortex in women decreased 6.4 percent every decade, and the reduction was only slightly less for men.

That thinning reduces the amount of energy the femur can absorb before buckling to cause a hip fracture, the researchers said. And the reason the thinning occurs is that older people tend to limit their exercise to walking, which does not strengthen the cortex of the femur, they suggested.

The Lancet.

Solution may not be that simple
But Charles H. Turner, a professor of biomedical engineering at Indiana University School of Medicine, said the solution may not be that simple.

Exercises would only be a partial solution
But even identifying such exercises would only be a partial solution to the problem of hip fractures in the elderly, said Dr Kenneth A. Egol, chief of the fracture service at New York University-Hospital for Joint Diseases.


Visit Health24's Osteoporosis Centre

 

Read Health24’s Comments Policy

Comment on this story
0 comments
Comments have been closed for this article.

Ask the Expert

Healthy Bones

Tereza is the CEO of the National Osteoporosis Foundation and worked as a Nursing Sister in the field of Osteoporosis for 18 years prior to her appointment with the Foundation. She used to be the Educational Officer for the Foundation and co-wrote the patient brochure on Osteoporosis. Read more

Still have a question?

Get free advice from our panel of experts

The information provided does not constitute a diagnosis of your condition. You should consult a medical practitioner or other appropriate health care professional for a physical exmanication, diagnosis and formal advice. Health24 and the expert accept no responsibility or liability for any damage or personal harm you may suffer resulting from making use of this content.

* You must accept our condition

Forum Rules