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Malaria

06 August 2008

Mosquito nets save lives

Even though malaria is a curable disease with effective treatment and prevention methods, it still takes the lives of 3 000 children and at least as many adults every day.

Even though malaria is a curable disease with effective treatment and prevention methods, it still takes the lives of 3 000 children and at least as many adults every day. Mosquito nets could change these statistics.

Young children and pregnant women carry the brunt of the malaria burden and the disease accounts for 60 percent of foetal losses and over 10 percent of maternal deaths world wide. It is also a major cause of anaemia, low birth weight and premature birth.

Prevention better than cure
Most malaria-carrying mosquitoes bite at night, and if properly used and maintained, mosquito nets can provide a physical barrier to hungry mosquitoes. If treated with insecticide, the effectiveness of nets is greatly improved, generating a chemical "halo" that extends beyond the net itself.

Malaria in South Africa
Although South Africa is not considered a high burden country for malaria, thousands of infections occur within our borders each year. According to the Department of Health's latest statistics more than 12 000 malaria cases occurred in 2006 mainly in the north-eastern provinces of Limpopo, Mpumalanga and KwaZulu Natal.

Travellers beware
Travellers to tropical and sub-tropical regions are regularly infected with malaria, and often only show symptoms once they have returned back home.

International Travel and Health (WHO) advise travellers to keep the four principles – the ABCD – of malaria protection in mind when travelling:

  • Be aware of the risk, the incubation period, the possibility of delayed onset, and the main symptoms.
  • Avoid being bitten by mosquitoes, especially between dusk and dawn.
  • Take anti-malarial drugs (Chemoprophylaxis) when appropriate, to prevent infection from developing into clinical disease.
  • Immediately seek diagnosis and treatment if a fever develops one week or more after entering an area where there is a malaria risk, and up to 3 months (or, rarely, later) after departure from a risk area.

Malaria background
Malaria is caused by a parasite of the Plasmodium species transmitted from the blood of an infected person and passed to a healthy human by the bite of a female Anopheles mosquito.

Plasmodium, each causing symptoms that vary in intensity and duration. Plasmodium falciparum is the deadliest of the four human malaria parasites.

Malaria and HIV
Malaria significantly aggravates the condition of HIV-infected people and increases HIV transmission. HIV increases the risk of infection with malaria and decreases response to standard anti-malarial treatment.

How you can help
The well-known explorer, Kingsley Holgate, in association with Nando's and other partners, has undertaken the "One Net One Life" project where Holgate and his team are circumnavigating the African continent to distribute mosquito nets to those at risk of malaria.

Source: World Health Organization


Preventing malaria
Malaria Centre

 

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