advertisement

Leg Vein Health

Updated 27 January 2016

DVT a danger during travel

Deep vein thrombosis (DVT) - blood clots in the leg - is a serious condition. People with DVT are given blood thinners to prevent a fatal pulmonary embolism.

Deep vein thrombosis (DVT) - blood clots in the leg - is a serious condition. People with DVT are given blood thinners to prevent a fatal pulmonary embolism. But many patients don't receive the follow-up care necessary to dissolve the clot.

Read: Leg pain signals deadly blood clots 

This can result in permanent damage to the leg's veins, a condition called post-thrombotic syndrome that can affect a person's ability to walk and stand. It can cause abnormal pooling of blood in the leg, chronic leg pain, leg fatigue, swelling and skin ulcers.

Read: Computer bofs run DVT risk

Post-thrombotic syndrome occurs in as many as 80 percent of all DVT patients. Using X-rays to guide them, interventional radiologists can dissolve blood clots using medications or by inserting tiny tools through a catheter directly to the clot.

This rapidly breaks up the clot and restores blood flow within the vein, reducing the risk of post-thrombotic syndrome. 

Read more: 

Exercise helps deep vein thrombosis complications 

Prevent blood clots when flying 

Keep those travel legs moving

 

Read Health24’s Comments Policy

Comment on this story
0 comments
Comments have been closed for this article.