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HIV/AIDS

Updated 26 June 2014

HIV & pregnancy

A woman who is HIV+ can have a healthy baby. Dr Avron Urison of AllLife explains the special care needed.

A woman who is HIV+ can have a healthy baby. Dr Avron Urison of AllLife explains the special care needed.

Unless a complication should arise, there is no need to increase the number of prenatal visits. Special counseling about a healthy diet with attention given to preventing iron or vitamin deficiencies and weight loss as well as special interventions for sexually transmitted diseases or other infections (such as malaria, urinary tract infections, tuberculosis or respiratory infections) should be part of the prenatal care of HIV-infected women.

  • Whether the mother breastfeeds exclusively
  • The duration of breastfeeding
  • The mother’s breast health
  • The mother’s nutritional and immune status

  • A woman who is HIV-negative or does not know her HIV status should exclusively breastfeed for six months.
  • A woman who is HIV-positive and chooses to use replacement feedings should be counseled on the safety and appropriate use of formula.
  • A woman who is HIV-positive and chooses to breastfeed should exclusively breastfeed for six months. The woman should also be advised regarding the changing risks to her baby during that six months, preventative treatments and early treatment of mastitis and oral problems, weaning plans and how to determine the appropriate time to switch to formula feeding.

 

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