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Colds and flu

Updated 01 March 2019

What causes a cold?

Although many people think you can catch a cold by not dressing warmly enough in the winter, this is a myth. The real culprit is one of more than 200 viruses.

There are many viruses that can cause colds, sometimes seasonally and sometimes in epidemics. It’s estimated that up to 50% of colds are caused by one of the more than 100 rhinoviruses (rhino = nose).

Other viruses that cause colds are the enteroviruses, coronaviruses, adenoviruses, respiratory syncytial virus and parainfluenza viruses. Some of these viruses are capable of causing more severe disease in very young infants (such as pneumonia), but only cause colds in older children and adults.

A person with a cold is usually contagious from 24 hours before symptoms start and as long as they last, which is usually about a week.

Rhinoviruses are most often spread by direct contact with infected secretions, e.g. touching objects such as handkerchiefs, door-knobs or eating utensils that a person with a cold has touched before, and then touching one's nose or mouth.

Rhinoviruses are less often spread by airborne particles, such as when an infected person sneezes.

Your immune system responds by attacking the virus with white blood cells. If your immune system cannot recognise the virus from a previous infection, the response is "non-specific", meaning your body produces as many white blood cells as possible and circulates them to the infected sites.

White cells produce chemicals to kill virus-infected cells, and this is what causes the nasal inflammation and swelling, increased mucous secretions and the general feeling of achiness.

Once infected with a specific cold virus, the body develops immunity to it in the form of "memory white cells" and antibodies, which will control the virus quickly in the event that it’s encountered again. Immunity will prevent another cold being caused by the same rhinovirus for some months at least, but doesn’t protect against others.

Reviewed by Cape Town-based general practitioner, Dr Dalia Hack. March 2019.

 

Ask the Expert

Flu expert

Dr Heidi van Deventer completed her MBChB (Bachelor of Medicine and Bachelor of Surgery) degree in 2004 at the University of Stellenbosch.
She has additional training in ACLS (Advanced Cardiac Life Support) and PALS (Paediatric Advanced Life Support) as well as biostatistics and epidemiology.

Dr Van Deventer is currently working as a researcher at the Desmond Tutu Tuberculosis Centre at the University of Stellenbosch.

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