advertisement
Updated 20 December 2018

Aspirin may prevent pancreatic cancer

A new study adds to aspirin's impressive list of accomplishments by finding that women who take the drug are less likely to get cancer of the pancreas.

A new study adds to aspirin's impressive list of accomplishments by finding that women who take the drug are less likely to get cancer of the pancreas.

Aspirin's role as a preventive medication isn't a new one. It's already used to prevent heart disease, and other studies have found it may help ward off colon cancer. In the latest work, appearing in the latest issue of the Journal of the National Cancer Institute, researchers from the University of Minnesota in the USA report that women who use aspirin have a 43 percent lower risk of pancreatic cancer than women who don't.

"There is no one magic pill that's a cure-all, but it's encouraging that aspirin use may be protective for pancreatic cancer - and it may tell us something about this disease for which we have no good treatment," says study author Kristin Anderson, an associate professor of epidemiology at the University of Minnesota's School of Public Health. - HealthScout

 
NEXT ON HEALTH24X
advertisement

Read Health24’s Comments Policy

Comment on this story
0 comments
Comments have been closed for this article.