advertisement

Arthritis

09 December 2017

Losing weight the right way can help your knees

Weight loss can slow knee arthritis, but it wasn't clear until now if the method of weight loss made any difference.

0

Knee arthritis can make it difficult to perform normal activities like walking or climbing stairs. It is a serious disability for many people.

Weight loss from dieting can slow the progression of knee arthritis in overweight people, according to a new study.

Degeneration of cartilage

A previous Health24 article reported that obese and overweight people who lost 5% or more of their weight over four years saw less degeneration of their knee cartilage compared with people whose weight stayed stable.

But losing pounds from exercise alone will not help preserve those ageing knees, the researchers found.

The study was scheduled for presentation at the annual meeting of the RSNA, in Chicago.

Obesity is a major risk factor for painful knee osteoarthritis – degeneration of cartilage caused by wear and tear. Weight loss can slow the disease, but it wasn't clear until now if the method of weight loss made a difference.

Apparently, it does.

Diet versus exercise

"These results add to the hypothesis that exercise alone as a regimen in order to lose weight in overweight and obese adults may not be as beneficial to the knee joint as weight loss regimens involving diet," said lead author Dr Alexandra Gersing.

Gersing made her comments in a news release from the Radiological Society of North America (RSNA). She's with the University of California, San Francisco's department of radiology and biomedical imaging.

The study included 760 overweight or obese adults who had mild to moderate knee osteoarthritis or were at risk for it. The participants were divided into a "control group" of patients who lost no weight, and a group who lost weight through either a combination of diet and exercise, diet alone, or exercise alone.

After eight years, cartilage degeneration was much lower in the weight-loss group than in the control group. However, that was true only of people who lost weight through diet and exercise, or diet alone, the investigators found.

Study participants who exercised without changing their diet lost as much weight as those who slimmed down through diet plus exercise or diet alone, but there was no significant difference in cartilage degeneration compared to the control group.

Image credit: iStock

 

Ask the Expert

Arthritis expert

Professor Asgar Ali Kalla completed his MBChB (Bachelor of Medicine and Bachelor of Surgery) degree in 1975 at the University of Cape Town and his FRCP in 2003 in London. Professor Ali Kalla is the Isaac Albow Chair of Rheumatology at the University of Cape Town and also the Head of Division of Rheumatology at Groote Schuur Hospital. He has participated in a number of clinical trials for rheumatology and is active in community outreach. Prof Ali Kalla is an expert in Arthritis for Health24.

Still have a question?

Get free advice from our panel of experts

The information provided does not constitute a diagnosis of your condition. You should consult a medical practitioner or other appropriate health care professional for a physical exmanication, diagnosis and formal advice. Health24 and the expert accept no responsibility or liability for any damage or personal harm you may suffer resulting from making use of this content.

* You must accept our condition

Forum Rules