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18 February 2011

Volunteers wanted - get a free pic of your brain

The search continues for volunteers to participate in a brain-imaging study on OCD and hair-pulling disorder. Participate in this study and receive a free pic of your brain.

The search continues for volunteers to participate in a brain-imaging study on OCD and hair-pulling disorder (trichotillomania). If you participate in this important study, you will receive a picture of your brain to take home with you.

The Cross-University Brain-Behaviour Initiative (CUBBI) of the University of Cape Town & the MRC Unit on Anxiety & Stress Disorders, University of Stellenbosch, aim to investigate the effects of a chemical agent (escitalopram) on a person’s thinking patterns and emotional responses, as determined by functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI).

  1. Right handed persons (aged between 18 and 65 years) diagnosed with OCD;
  2. Right handed persons (aged between 18 and 65 years) diagnosed with hair-pulling disorder (trichotillomania);
  3.  Healthy right handed first-degree relatives (aged between 18 and 65 years) of persons diagnosed with OCD.
     

Participation involves attendance of 3 sessions, with the first session comprising of an interview, filling out of questionnaires and taking a blood sample for genetic analysis.  During the subsequent two sessions a brain scan, with the once-off administration of escitalopram (20mg) beforehand, is done.  In addition, participants complete a number of neuropsychological tasks in the form of computerised games.  All procedures are carefully explained by the investigators.

 
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