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11 October 2010

Most Americans Back Embryonic Stem Cell Research: Poll

Wide range of support, including Republicans, Catholics and born-again Christians, Harris Interactive/HealthDay poll finds

This article has not necessarily been edited by Health24.

Only 12 percent oppose using stem cells for biomedical research, numbers that mirror those from a similar poll conducted in 2005.

  • Seventy-three percent (versus 72 percent in 2005) believe that stem cell research should be allowed "as long as the parents of the embryo give their permission, and the embryo would otherwise be destroyed."
  • Fifty-eight percent of Republicans think stem cell research is acceptable (versus 24 percent opposed), as do 69 percent of Catholics and 58 percent of born-again Christians. Sixteen percent of Catholics and 22 percent of born-again Christians oppose it.
  • Two-thirds of the respondents agreed that, "If most scientists believe that stem cell research will greatly increase our ability to prevent or treat serious diseases we should trust them and let them do it."
  • Twenty percent think embryonic stem cell research "comes too close to allowing scientists to play God."
  • Almost two-thirds (62 percent) said they do not agree that "allowing any medical research using stem cells from human embryos should be forbidden because it is unethical and immoral."
  • Slightly more than half of the respondents said they feel that lack of federal funding for stem cell research would leave the United States far behind other nations in developing new drugs and preventing diseases.
  • Twenty-eight percent of those polled agreed with the following statement: "I don't believe that we should put the interests of medical science ahead of the preservation of human life, which includes human embryos."

 
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