advertisement
Updated 04 April 2014

Screening tests for women

You have a vague idea of what you should be tested for and when, but if push comes to shove, your knowledge is a bit shaky. We give you the lowdown.

You have a vague idea of what you should be tested for and when, but if push comes to shove, your knowledge is a bit shaky. We give you the lowdown.

Teens and tests
If you become sexually active during your teens, you must have a pelvis exam and a Pap smeartest done regularly. Other tests depend on your state of health and also on conditions prevalent in the family. If there are other family members with diabetes, for instance, it might be a good idea to be regularly screened for that. A regular check-up with the GP is also advised and he/she will recommend screening tests that are deemed necessary.

Women between 20 and 40

Screening tests to be done during this time

Pap testEvery 1 - 2 years
Blood pressureAt least every two years
Pelvic examEvery year
CholesterolEvery five years
Clinical breast examEvery 3 years

Women between 40 and 60

Screening tests to be done during this time

Pap testEvery two to three years
Blood pressureAt least every two years
Pelvic examEvery year
CholesterolEvery five years
Clinical breast examEvery three years
MammographyEvery year
Colon cancer screeningEvery year

Women aged 60+

Pap testNot necessary after age 70
Blood pressureAt least every two years
Pelvic examEvery year
CholesterolEvery five years
Clinical breast examEvery year
MammographyEvery year
Colon cancer screeningEvery year

(Health24.com, updated 2014)

Read more: Screening tests for men

 
NEXT ON HEALTH24X
advertisement

Read Health24’s Comments Policy

Comment on this story
0 comments
Comments have been closed for this article.

Live healthier

Lifestyle »

E-cigarettes: Here are five things to know

E-cigarettes have become hugely popular in the past decade, but a rash of vaping-linked deaths and illnesses in the US is feeding caution about a product that's already banned in some places.

Allergy »

Ditch the itch: Researchers find new drug to fight hives

A new drug works by targeting an immune system antibody called immunoglobulin E, which is responsible for the allergic reaction that causes hives.

advertisement