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Updated 25 June 2015

Mouth ulcers can be so painful

You are stressed and tired, and now on top of everything else, you get mouth ulcers.

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Mouth ulcers are little sores that have a whitish yellow appearance. They are found on the inside of the cheeks and can appear both singly or in crops. At some time in their lives, more than 10 percent of the population experience them. In general, the larger they are, the more pain they cause. Many women appear to get these when they are either exhausted or premenstrual.

Causes of mouth ulcers

  • Nutritional deficiencies. When there are insufficient nutrients present in the body, the immune system becomes less effective and conditions like mouth ulcers are more likely to occur.
  • Food allergies. Wheat allergies can sometimes cause mouth ulcers, especially if it is re-introduced into the diet after some time.
  • Undue stress
  • Accidental trauma. If you hit yourself with a toothbrush or knock into something, it can result in ulceration.
  • Fluctuating hormone levels

Things you can do to prevent mouth ulcers

  • Take multi-vitamins or mineral supplements, especially extra vitamin C.
  • Make sure that you are eating a balanced diet. If you are still getting ulcers, check that you are not allergic to anything.
  • Speak to your GP about this. If you are still having a problem, she can possibly prescribe a zinc-based mouthwash or hydro-cortisone pellets or cream.
  • Get enough sleep and try and to some relaxation exercises if you are stressed out. A weekend away could do wonders in making your mouth ulcers disappear.


 
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