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Updated 26 September 2016

The truth about female ejaculation

There are many theories about whether or not female ejaculation occurs.

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Recent studies have shown that it does, and is completely natural. Read to find out more.

What is it?
Female ejaculation is the expulsion of fluid in a noticeable amount from the urethra of women during orgasm. It is estimated that between ten percent and forty percent of women are able to ejaculate.

What does it look like?
Female ejaculate can differ in appearance, texture and quantity. It can range from being a clear to a milky liquid, or from feeling watery to feeling sticky. Amounts can range from a teaspoon, to (in some extreme cases) a cup full.

What does female ejaculate consist of?
Ed Belzer, a professor at Dalhousie University found varying amounts of acid phosphotase in female ejaculate. It was previously believed that only males produced this chemical in the prostate gland.

Studies have also revealed consistent results showing reduced concentrations of urea and creatinine in female ejaculate, urines primary components.

Though it is not entirely clear what female ejaculate is made up of, researchers have concluded that it is not purely urine, and that it is not the odourless secretion of the Bartholin gland that helps lubricate the vaginal tract, but a combination of urine, acid phosphotase and other inconsistent chemicals.

These studies have also shown the existence of a prostate-like gland within females, previously thought to be non-existent.

How is female ejaculation achieved?
The percentages of women that do ejaculate do so during orgasm. Gynaecological studies have shown that most female ejaculation occurs during sexual stimulation of the 'G-spot'.

As the G-spot is stimulated, it swells and begins a fluid discharge through the urethra.

Clinical studies have also shown that the female response to G-spot stimulation is extremely similar to the male response to prostate stimulation. The first couple of seconds of stimulation introduces a strong urge to urinate, but is quickly replaced with noticeable sexual pleasure.

Image: Couple kissing in bed from Shutterstock

 
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