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25 October 2010

The science of falling in love

A study has found that falling in love - which takes a fifth of a second - also elicits the same euphoric feeling as using cocaine and affects intellectual areas of the brain.

A study has found that falling in love - which takes a fifth of a second - also elicits the same euphoric feeling as using cocaine and affects intellectual areas of the brain. This new meta-analysis study was conducted by Syracuse University Professor Stephanie Ortigue and is getting attention around the world.

The study, titled "The Neuroimaging of Love" reveals falling in love can elicit not only the same euphoric feeling as using cocaine, but also affects intellectual areas of the brain.

Ortigue is an assistant professor of psychology and an adjunct assistant professor of neurology, both in The College of Arts and Sciences at Syracuse University.

"That’s a tricky question always," says Ortigue. "I would say the brain, but the heart is also related because the complex concept of love is formed by both bottom-up and top-down processes from the brain to the heart and vice versa. For instance, activation in some parts of the brain can generate stimulations to the heart, butterflies in the stomach. Some symptoms we sometimes feel as a manifestation of the heart may sometimes be coming from the brain."

 
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