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10 July 2011

Are you healthy enough to fly?

You booked your ticket overseas a year ago but are not feeling all too well at the moment. Should you still travel?

You are about to fly overseas but are a bit concerned about your current state of health. Should you still travel?

  • Recent deep vein thrombosis (within four weeks).
     
  • Recent heart attack (within six weeks).
     
  • Recent stroke (within two weeks).
     
  • Severe high blood pressure.
     
  • Recent thoracic surgery (within three weeks).
     
  • Unstable heart disease.

Lung problems:

  • Pneumothorax (air between the lung and the chest wall).
     
  • Pulmonary cysts.
     
  • Acute bronchospasm (like in an acute asthma attack).
     
  • Cyanosis (too little oxygen in the blood).
     
  • Severe shortness of breath at rest.
     
  • Pulmonary hypertension.
     
  • Pneumonia.
     
  • Unstable lung function disorders.

  • Recent eye surgery.
     
  • Recent middle ear surgery.
     
  • Acute sinusitis.
     
  • Acute middle ear infection (grommets are not an contraindication).
     
  • Permanent wiring of the jaw.

  • Recent abdominal surgery (within two weeks).
     
  • Acute diverticulitis or ulcerative colitis.
     
  • Acute gastroenteritis (vomiting and diarrhoea).
     
  • Acute oesophageal varices.

  • Uncontrolled epilepsy.
     
  • Previous violent or unpredictable behaviour.
     
  • Recent scull fracture.
     
  • Brain tumour.

  • Severe anaemia (Hb 8.5g/dl in an adult).
     
  • Sickle cell disease.
     
  • Leukaemia with active bleeding.
     
  • Haemophilia with active bleeding.

  • The last month of pregnancy.
     
  • Threatening miscarriage.

 
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