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10 March 2011

Teen brain can fight peer pressure as it grows

Even as peer pressure mounts in early adolescence, kids' brains are developing an ability to help fight the temptations of risky behaviour, novel new research reports.

Even as peer pressure mounts in early adolescence, kids' brains are developing an ability to help fight the temptations of risky behaviour, novel new research reports.

Over the study period, activity increases in a brain region known as the ventral striatum correlated with an increase in the children's self-reported ability to deflect peer pressure, said study author Jennifer Pfeifer, an assistant professor of psychology at the University of Oregon and director of its Developmental Social Neuroscience Lab.

Girls a lot less risky

 She added that early adolescence is a key period because peer influence has been shown to be greatest during late elementary to early high school.

 
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