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17 May 2011

Smoking ups odds for prostate cancer return

In men who've had their prostate surgically removed due to prostate cancer, smoking seems linked to a rise in blood levels of prostate specific antigen (PSA) - a measure of the risk of cancer recurrence.

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In men who've had their prostate surgically removed due to prostate cancer, smoking seems linked to a rise in blood levels of prostate specific antigen (PSA) - a measure of the risk of cancer recurrence.

The study included 321 smokers and 309 nonsmokers who underwent radical prostatectomy (surgical removal of the prostate) between 1989 and 2005. Smokers had a higher volume and a greater volume of high-grade cancer than nonsmokers, according to the Stanford University School of Medicine researchers.

Smoking raises PSA levels

Smokers also tended to chart a steeper rise in their blood levels of PSA, signaling a greater risk of "biochemical recurrence" of prostate cancer. PSA levels rose approximately 1% per pack-year smoked, the team found.

"These data indicate that smoking history could provide valuable insight and should be included in risk-assessment models for prostate cancer," study presenter Dr Joseph C. Presti said.

"The study also presents a strong message to men: quitting smoking now could impact your ability to survive prostate cancer later," he added.


(Copyright © 2010 HealthDay. All rights reserved.)

 
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