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06 August 2010

Iams and Eukanuba in SA are safe

Despite a recall in the US, diets in the three ranges (Iams, Eukanuba and Eukanuba Veterinary Diets) in South Africa are completely unaffected and safe for pets.

Despite a recall in the US, diets in the three ranges (Iams, Eukanuba and Eukanuba Veterinary Diets) in South Africa are completely unaffected and safe for pets.

In an urgent press release from Dr Sarah Miller, Director of Cube Route Pty (Ltd), it was confirmed that none of the South African produccts come from the USA - they are manufactured in a plant in The Netherlands (Coevorden) and as such as unaffected by the US recall.

The release further stated that:

  • Given the fact that salmonella prevention is an industry wide challenge, our constant monitoring on the presence of potentially harmful bacteria and other microorganisms shows a longstanding track record of excellent results.
  • These results are confirmed by frequent independent testing by the Dutch authorities.  Their randomly taken probations have all been negative on salmonella since the inception of the plant.
  • Finished product is also tested for salmonella before it is shipped to South Africa. Again, all tests have always been negative.

 The US recall

With regard to the US recall, Miller added that the recall was only a precationary measaure as no salmonella-related illnesses had yet been reported.

"The Procter and Gamble Company (P&G) is voluntarily expanding its recall to include veterinary and some specialised dry pet food as a precautionary measure because it has the potential to be contaminated with salmonella. Please note No salmonella-related illnesses have been reported.

 
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