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22 November 2010

Tiger trade likened to drugs

Ahead of this week's Tiger Summit, a new report challenges the ability of the proposed Global Tiger Recovery Program (GTRP) to save the wild tiger.

Ahead of this week's Tiger Summit, a new report challenges the ability of the proposed Global Tiger Recovery Program (GTRP) to save the wild tiger.

According to the study’s authors, Michael ‘t Sas-Rolfes and Kirsten Conrad: “The GTRP ignores the fact that a seventeen-year ban on trade in tiger parts has failed to sufficiently reduce tiger poaching. In fact, attempting to enforce this ban may be part of the problem rather than the solution.”

“Many consumers are aware of the tiger’s plight and that it is illegal to buy their parts, yet they continue to do so, even as prices increase. In this respect, the demand for tiger parts is similar to the demand for illicit drugs”, explained the authors.

 
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