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13 April 2007

Diabetes tied to pollution

There may be a link between pollutants called persistent organic pesticides (POPs) and type 2 diabetes, says a new international study.

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There may be a link between pollutants called persistent organic pesticides (POPs) and type 2 diabetes, says an international study published in the journal Diabetes Care.

The study found high levels of POPs in the blood were associated with insulin resistance, a precursor to diabetes. The study authors noted that POPs are stored in fatty tissues and suggested that this may be why obese people have an increased risk of developing diabetes, BBC News reported.

People with insulin resistance are unable to remove excess glucose from their blood. This is often a major step in the development of type 2 diabetes.

However, some experts said this study does not offer conclusive evidence of a link between POPs and the development of diabetes, BBC News reported. It may be that insulin resistance may hinder a person's ability to clear POPs from the body.

Matt Hunt, head of science information at Diabetes UK, said this is a complex area of research and this study and others have offered no details of a mechanism by which POPs could cause insulin resistance, BBC News reported. – (HealthDayNews)

Read more:
Diabetes Centre
Enviro health Centre

April 2007

 
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