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Question
Posted by: Christel | 2003/01/08

Rheumatoid Arthiritis

Dear Fitness Doc,

I am 30years old and have been diagnosed with Rheumatoid Arthiritis by my GP thorugh a blood test. I have made an appointment to see a specialist at the end of Feb. My GP did inform me that I have to keep my joints mobile.. I am a bit confused as to what exercise I can do and can`t do..
I have been an avid runner in the past but I know that I won`t be able to continue. If you could please get back to me.
Many thanks
Christel

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Our expert says:
Expert ImageFitnessDoc

Hi there

I suggest you visit the Arthritis Foundation website - where there is excellent advice about exercising with Arthritis (www.arthritis.org). Clearly exercise can improve you condition in many respects.

Here is one article taken from this site - I hope it helps.


Walking and Arthritis
Taken from Walking and Arthritis brochure
Walking is good for anyone, especially people with arthritis. It’s an endurance exercise, which means it strengthens your heart, helps your lungs work more efficiently and gives you more stamina so you don’t tire as easily. As a weight-bearing exercise (one that puts full weight on your bones), walking helps strengthen bones, reducing the risk of osteoporosis (thinning of the bones). This is especially important if you’re taking glucocorticoids for your arthritis, which can weaken bones.

Walking strengthens your muscles and helps maintain joint flexibility. For people with arthritis, muscle and joint benefits are important because joints become more stiff and muscles weaken with inactivity. As walking strengthens the muscles and tissues surrounding the joints, it helps to better protect those joints and keep them ready for daily activities.

In addition to all the physical benefits, walking also brings with it a host of psychological perks. Regular exercise helps you sleep better, controls your weight and lifts your spirits. It can play an important part in combating the depression, fatigue and stress that accompany your arthritis.

The information provided does not constitute a diagnosis of your condition. You should consult a medical practitioner or other appropriate health care professional for a physical exmanication, diagnosis and formal advice. Health24 and the expert accept no responsibility or liability for any damage or personal harm you may suffer resulting from making use of this content.

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